New Home Design Plans – Making the Right Choice For Your New Home

When building a new home, researching various design plans is a very helpful way to ensure you get exactly what you want. If you are looking online, you will likely find thousands of different plans and architectural drawings to consider. Rather than trawling aimlessly through these listings, first jot down a few things on paper. Start by estimating a budget (remembering what you can afford); think about location – where you want to build (at this stage it would also pay to ring your local council to find out about building regulations), and what size and style of house you would like. This will help narrow down your options when it comes to searching online for new home design plans that fit your criteria.

New home design plans come in many different styles and varieties. It’s up to you to review the options and discuss your needs with your builder so that you can make the most of your house building project. If you have a section already, think about how your blueprints fit with the land in terms of space, where the sun is throughout the day and where the main access from the road should be. You will get a more tangible idea of how your new home design plans work once the foundation outline is measured out. This is the time to speak up with your builder and/or architect if you want changes made to the overall layout.

Choosing the right location for your home is critical, and some new home design plans will be specifically created for a certain neighbourhood or building project that the developer is working on. If this is the case for you, make sure that the developers style of housing suits what you desire in a new house, and if there is any room for customisation.

You should also consult with the building companies that you are considering working with. Each one should be professional and experienced, and be willing to work with you to create the best new home design plans every single time. Show them the plans you like and get their opinions and recommendations about making adjustments to include other features you like. If you are on a limited budget, you might want to consider utilising plans that have already been drawn up. Make sure that your new dwelling looks exactly the way that you want, because new home construction gives you the chance to get just that.

In the end, it’s all about getting what you want and need right on the blueprints. It is much easier to make adjustments on paper then it is once your foundations have been poured. This way you can rest assured that your future residence will be absolutely perfect for you and/or your family.

Custom Homes – Storage Space Can Make Or Break a New Home Design Or Home Addition

Where are we going to put everything? That’s a common question when looking at buying a new home that doesn’t have adequate storage or space. People love their stuff but hate clutter. It’s a problem that is best solved at the design stage.
 
As the population ages and home sizes trend smaller, storage space becomes infinitely more important when designing a new home or home addition. Even if you don’t see the need personally, it’s best to keep your home’s resale value in mind.
 
People love to save! And over time, people’s stuff accumulates and they grow more attached. They won’t buy a home without the storage space they need.
 
Give a Clear Message to Your Designer or Architect
 
Over the years of working with people as they get their new home or home addition concept out of their minds and onto paper, I’ve learned that it’s often difficult to convey their real needs to an architect. Their desire for space and tidiness gets trumped by the “glitter” of more visible and tangible aspects of a home’s design.

 
You must get specific about what you want. Don’t leave storage space up to the designer without making it very clear what you want and why. Then let your designer use her creativity to bring it about.
 
Specific Storage Considerations
 
I hope you’re convinced about the value of creating ample storage! Here are several ways to solve storage problems in your home’s design.
 
CLOSETS:
 
Both the size and number of closets are critical. Walk in closets where possible are best. Hallway closets are always desirable. Consider interior closet designs as well that really maximize the storage and use capabilities of the closets.
 
KITCHEN PANTRY:
 
The size isn’t as important as the value of having one. But the smaller the pantry, the greater the need for excellent design of the space. Separate rooms are desirable but cabinet pantries can also work.
 
LAUNDRY ROOM:
 
The laundry is not often considered as storage space but usually ends up as a storage room! For this reason, designing the laundry with storage in mind is wise.
 
GARAGE:
 
Cars, boats, RVs, and other recreational vehicles can really clutter up your property without providing for their storage. Great design can make these “toys” almost disappear. Also, with forethought, you can design in extra storage for other items at the same time.

 
ATTIC & BASEMENT:
 
Many newer homes and certain markets do not have basements and attics. If you’re designing a new home or addition, look for ways to utilize these as they can be very valuable for storage. And be sure to design in easy access to them.
 
Convenience and Resale Value
 
Keeping storage space high on your priority list will keep a great home design from going sour on you. If left to an afterthought, it’ll become all you think about later on. Don’t let that happen to you!

Kitchens and Baths Receiving More Attention in New Home Design

At the height of the housing downturn the most impacted areas in new home design were also once the most lucrative: kitchens and baths. For several years new home owners passed on popular and expensive add-ons to their kitchens and bathrooms such as water filtration systems, large pantry areas and natural wood cabinets. However, a recently published A.I.A Home Design Trends Survey indicates these functions and more might see a comeback.

Renovation and remodeling contractors want to make the most of a renewed interest in these once popular amenities. Homeowners who passed on the functions to save money during construction are now more interested in having it installed after the fact. Meanwhile, some architects report an upward trend in the kitchen space requested by customers during the design of their new homes. What might it mean for renovation and remodeling contractors? More business.

The area that received the most attention was the kitchen. 22 percent of respondents in the A.I.A report said the size of the kitchen is increasing in new home design and construction. The rediscovered focus on size opens up the possibility of remodeling and addition work that can be done in this popular and lucrative sector. The dominant feature requested for new kitchens are renewable materials. Almost half of the surveyed architects said that materials such as bamboo, cork and concrete are becoming increasingly popular.

Bathrooms are a different story. The report suggests their size and quantity is remaining stable but with an added emphasis on accessibility of design. The trend towards more accessible, safer bathrooms has long been anticipated by contractors as current generations choose to stay in their homes into old age. Doorless showers and handheld shower heads are a popular addition to customer bathrooms.

Contractors are already beginning to mount advertising campaigns aimed at these unique customers. It remains to be seen if homes constructed in the residential downturn will become the latest, hottest market.

Overall, the report indicates a trend of stabilization in the design of kitchens and bathrooms with notable upticks in certain areas. Savvy renovation and remodeling contractors are cashing in on the number of households that renounced popular features during the downturn. Meanwhile, others expect more remodeling and addition options as the size of kitchen and bath design continues to increase in new home construction.

Check out the AIA’s full fourth quarter of 2010 Home Design Trends Survey Report.